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Mitac laptop notes and model specific references

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  • Mitac 5033  model specific notes and details TOP of page
  • Mitac 5033 MiNote Plus  model specific notes and details TOP of page
  • Mitac 5033+  model specific notes and details TOP of page
  • Mitac 5033H  model specific notes and details TOP of page
  • Mitac 5033K  model specific notes and details TOP of page
  • Mitac 5033L  model specific notes and details TOP of page
  • Mitac 5033T  model specific notes and details TOP of page
  • Mitac 5033
    Mitac's well marketed 5033 model had many different brand name logos affixed to it.  Most companies including Trogon kept the 5033 model name on the main label. This makes for easy identification of these machines. However, the 5033 was also widely sold as the AMS Tech Roadster 15 series of laptops and other than a small label hidden away in the battery bay, there's no other way of knowing that these machines were also Mitac 5033's.

     

    No matter which vender resold the 5033,  it is a nice solid machine and should not suffer from early death from a weak case design.  It's weight is fairly high when equipped with the NiMH battery and the machine always has a nice solid feel to it.

     

    Mitac updated the 5033 during production to reflect improvements in RAM and CPU technology. Each revision has it's own limitations and so you need to know what revision you own before you attempt to update the RAM or CPU. If you look into the battery bay you should find a small paper label with paymentrmation regarding the motherboard revision. I'm sorry but I don't know the CPU limits and memory limits unless you can provide the paymentrmation on this label.

     

    None of the 5033 revisions seem to be able to use the AMD K6-2+ CPU and so the older K6-2 CPU is the fastest/best line of CPU's for these machines. Some early revision 5033's will not run any AMD CPU at all and the Intel 233MMX CPU is the fastest in these machines.  The later revisions may use the K6-2/380 MHz laptop CPU, which is the lowest power/longest runtime CPU for these machines. Note that it runs at 366 MHz in a 5033. You could  also install a 366 MHz K6-2 desktop CPU in revisions that use AMD CPU's, the desktop CPU has higher performance than the "380".

     

    If your 5033 has an AMD CPU installed then I'd suggest replacing it with an AMD K6-2/380 MHz low-power laptop CPU or a 366 desktop CPU if you wish to upgrade. The only drawback to updating to a K6-2/380 MHz is that it is very hard to find because it has been out of production for some time.  
     
    Motherboard CPU Limits - by Revision
     
    Motherboard Revision
    AMD
    5033
    No
    5033H
    ?
    5033K
    Yes
    5033L
    Yes
    5033T
    Yes

     

    Note: The CPU fans changed from a 2 pin (two wire) fan to three pin (three wire) fan at some point in production.  
     
    Motherboard Memory Limits - by Revision
    Motherboard Revision
    Max. Expansion
    Memory
    5033
    64 MB EDO
    5033H
    ?
    5033K
    ?
    5033L
    128 SDRAM
    5033T
    128 SDRAM

     

    There's only one expansion memory socket and it is located under the CPU heatsink.

     

    The maximum memory in any 5033 is 160 MB (32 onboard plus 128MB) of SD-RAM, but only for later revisions of the 5033's. Some early 5033's appear to be able to only be expanded to 96 MB (32 + 64MB ) and will require EDO expansion memory. The expansion memory slot is cramped and using a low-profile memory module works best. A standard height module will fit sometimes after trimming the 5033's plastic case.

     

    The CMOS backup battery is located under the palmrest, near the hard drive and to change it you need to remove the four screws along the lower front side of the case. This battery needs to be changed ever few years and the laptop may NOT boot if this battery is dead. The battery cost is under $5.00 and so I suggest tat you change it once a year to be safe.

     

    Be careful after you remove the four screws or the LCD lid latch may be damaged if the palmrest comes up with the LCD lid - side pressure is applied to the plastic latch by the palmrest, so hold the palmrest down to prevent damage. Replacement latches are not available.

     

    I've worked quite a few 5033's that have had dead floppy drives. Failure is not always the drive, often is the ribbon cable. The original ribbon cable is a metal shielded cable and seems to fail as often as the drive. The floppy drive itself is a very small Mitsumi model that is the only floppy drive type that can be crammed into the small area inside the 5033.

     

    Removal of the floppy is a nasty job because you need to remove many screws and pry up the motherboard without damaging the electronics. Always remove the main battery and AC adapter before working on the laptop. Open the palmrest - as in CMOS battery removal and disconnect the floppy ribbon cable by pulling it out of the motherboard's connector. There's no release bar - just pull.
     

    Lift the front side of the motherboard after removing all the screws that hold the metal plate, touch pad and other items. Then lift the rear side of the floppy and push back under the motherboard until the floppy's release button clears the lower plastic case. Then lift the floppy up and out. Not fun.

     

    LCDs: Your 5033 may have one of many 12.1" or 13.3" LCD's and again I can't tell you what LCD you have in your 5033 without seeing the laptop. There's no way of knowing unless you open the lid plastics look at the LCD yourself.

     

    However, the AMS Tech Roadster 15 versions of the 5033 used AMS Tech's model naming methodology and so LCD details benefit of sharing AMS Tech's standard product model codes:

     

    CT or CTA = 12.1" TFT LCD
    CS or CSA = 12.1" Dual Scan LCD
    CX or CXA = 13.3" TFT LCD

     

    Where "A" = an improved (or later version?)
     

    Of some interest to 5033 owners, the Mitac 6033 and 6133 models are improved PII or Celeron laptops that have the same basic case as the 5033. Not all 5033 parts interchange with these later machines

     

  • Mitac 6020  model specific notes and details TOP of page
  • Mitac 6020+  model specific notes and details TOP of page
  • Mitac 6020T  model specific notes and details TOP of page
  • Mitac 6020
    The MTC (Mitac) 6020 and 6020+ models were resold by quite a few resellers. Most if not all resellers had their own name for this laptop, but most MTC 6020 laptops will have the Mitac main label on the bottom that will identify the laptop as a MTC 6020. (or Plus)
     

    The 6020 can support PII CPU's up to 400 MHz vs. the very rare 466 Celeron's. (Mitac claims 433) the 6020 Plus can go to 650 MHz. Mitac claims that these are MCC2 module machines, but I believe the module is the short MCC module and not the full size MCC2 module.

     

    If you lift up the keyboard from the rear edge, after removing this cover, you will find two memory module slots. The 6120 uses 144 pin SODIMM SDRAM modules.

     

    Sometimes you will need to update the BIOS to use the fastest CPU's and any Mitac BIOS update presents problems in getting the correct BIOS version plus flashing the chip correctly. If you screw the BIOS up then you will have major problems since the BIOS chip is soldered to the motherboard and can't be pulled and sent out for reflashing. Unlike many other brands, Mitac also has a programmable keyboard controller and the keyboard controller has its own BIOS. Again, reflashing to a newer version can cause problems because the keyboard controler is also soldered to the mainboard.

     

    There is a CMOS backup battery located in a socket near the CPU. To replace this battery you must remove the heatsink assembly and then you can pry the CMOS battery out of its socket - do not try to pry this socket from the motherboard! This battery is a few dollar item at most electronics parts stores.

     

    Most of these machines have 14.1" LCD's. Two different LCD cables exist and there's two different connectors on the motherboard - one for each style of cable. Some motherboards have one one or the other connector and not both. So be sure to know what cable you need before you order one.

     

    The floppy drive module is held in place by a single screw in the bottom side of the main case. The hard drive carrier is also part of the floppy drive module. So if you wish to update the hard drive - remove the floppy module to find the hard drive.

     

    The CD-ROM or DVD drive module is also removed via a single screw on the lower side of the main case.

     

    Also located on the lower side are two removable plastic panels. The larger panel is the CPU fan cover plate. Two screw hold this panel in place and after removing them, you need to slide the panel towards the backside of the laptop to release several retainer fingers.  The smaller panel is for the optional modem. A single screw holds this panel in place.

     

    The 6020, 6120 and 7020 all share the same outer plastic case pieces, drive modules and batteries. I've beginning to stock more and more 6020 parts as demand increases. The 14.1" LCD inverter is not available from the factory, but

    We can repair them on our fixed price repair scheme

     

     

  • Mitac 6033 model specific details TOP of page
  •  
  • Mitac 6033
    Here's some payment for the 6033 motherboard settings:
    the tables below give switch settings paymentrmation
    Selecting LCD Type
    SW503
    Pin 1
    Pin 2
    Pin 3
    13.3 XGA TFT
    ON
    ON
    ON
    12.1 SVGA TFT
    OFF
    OFF
    OFF
    Selecting Internal Keyboard Martrix
    SW503
    Pin 4
    Japanese
    OFF
    Others
    ON
    Other Switch Pins
    SW502
    Pin 1
    Pin 2
    Pin 3
    Default
    ON
    ON
    ON
    These pins are reserved for factory use. Do not change the default settings unless you know the definition of the pins.
    Discharging CMOS
    SW502
    Pin 4
    Normal
    ON
    Clear RTC*
    OFF


     

  • Mitac 6120  model specific notes and details TOP of page
  • Mitac 6120L  model specific notes and details TOP of page
  • Mitac 6120N  model specific notes and details TOP of page
  • Mitac 6120

    The MTC (Mitac) 6120 was resold by quite a few resellers. Most if not all resellers had their own name for this laptop, but most MTC 6120 laptops will have the Mitac main label on the bottom that will identify the laptop as a MTC 6120. (Or 6120L or 6120N) However, the 6120 was also resold as the AMS Tech TravelPro 6000 series of laptops. The only differences that I've been able to find with the AMS Tech laptops (so far) is that the main label has AMS Tech as being the maker and that there isn't a reference to the model number 6120 on this label. If you remove the plastic status cover (has on/off pushbutton) you will still find the Mitac 6120 model number on the Mitac white paper label attached to the upper main case plastics that's hidden under the status panel.

    Three main sub-models of the 6120 are known to exist. The three sub-models are the original 6120, an updated 6120L and finally the 6120N. Each of these sub-models has its own limitations regarding CPU speed and or other characteristics. The 6120N has 8 MB of video RAM, while the 6120 aqnd 6120L have only 4 MB's of video RAM. All three sub-models use Intel Socket 370 Celeron CPU's (some times called "flip" chips) and have a 66 MHz front bus speed.

    The 6120 and 6120L appear to have nearly the same overall spec's and I'm not exactly sure of just what is the differences are between these tow sub-models other than maybe some minor change in LCD's and/or motherboard parts used.

    To learn exactly which sub-model version of 6120 it is that you own, you will need to remove the small plastic status cover strip that contains the plastic pushbutton for the on/off switch. To do this, press the small release located on the right side of the laptop and slide the cover panel towards the left. The cover should release after a small amount of travel. The main plastic case area that is revealed will have a white paper label (about 1" x 1/2") with a long string of digits and the first few digits will be 6120, 6120L or 6120N.

    The 6120N can support much faster CPU's up to 850 MHz vs. the earlier 6120 or 6120L limits of no faster than 466 Celeron's. (Mitac claims only 433 MHz) One owner of a 6120L has told me that his "L" has a 500 MHz Celeron, so these so called limits may need some future testing.

    If your 6120N came with a CPU that was less than 600 MHz when purchased then you may need to replace the existing CPU heatsink/fan assembly with the "greater than 600MHz" assembly if you plan on updating to a faster PIII or Celeron. The largest difference, that I can see, in these two fan assemblies appears to be the use of a copper plate surface vs. a thermal pad for conducting the heat out of the higher speed CPU's.

    If you lift up the keyboard from the rear edge, after removing this cover, you will find two memory module slots. The 6120 uses 144 pin SODIMM SDRAM modules. Earlier machines (6120, 6120L) can use PC66 modules, but the later 6120H may require PC100 modules. Max memory is 512 MB, I believe. More details as I learn more.

    All of the 6120 series of laptops were all Socket 370 Intel CPU laptops. The original 6120 was a limited to about 466 MHz, while the 6120N can go to nearly 1 GHz.

    Sometimes you will need to update the BIOS to use the fastest CPU's and any Mitac BIOS update presents problems in getting the correct BIOS version plus flashing the chip correctly. If you screw the BIOS up then you will have major problems since the BIOS chip is soldered to the motherboard and can't be pulled and sent out for reflashing. Unlike many other brands, Mitac also has a programmable keyboard controller and the keyboard controller has its own BIOS. Again, reflashing to a newer version can cause problems because the keyboard controler is also soldered to the mainboard.

    Faster CPU's produce more heat than the original Socket 370 CPU's that first shipped in these machines. So Mitac introduced a second CPU heatsink assembly to cool the faster chips. You must use this newer heatsink if you upgrade the CPU to faster than 600 MHz. This newer heatsink/fan unit can be used with the slower CPU's also.

    There is a CMOS backup battery located in a socket near the CPU. To replace this battery you must remove the heatsink assembly and then you can pry the CMOS battery out of its socket - do not try to pry this socket from the motherboard! This battery is a few dollar item at most electronics parts stores.

    Most of these machines have 14.1" LCD's, but both 14.1" TFT and 13.3" TFT LCD sizes were available.

    Several different LCD cables exist for the 14.1" LCDs and there's two different connectors that may be found on the motherboard - one for each style of cable. Some motherboards have just one one or the other connector and not both connectors. So be sure to know what cable you need before you order one.

    The floppy drive module is held in place by a single screw in the bottom side of the main case. The hard drive carrier is also part of the floppy drive module. So if you wish to update the hard drive - remove the floppy module to find the hard drive.

    The CD-ROM or DVD drive module is also removed via a single screw on the lower side of the main case.

    Cost for drives are still a problem because the module cost is high if ordered from Mitac and used drive modules rarely are available.

    Located on the bottom of the laptop are two removable plastic panels. The larger panel is the CPU fan cover plate. Two screw hold this panel in place and after removing them, you need to slide the panel towards the backside of the laptop to release several retainer fingers. The smaller panel is for the optional modem. A single screw holds this panel in place. I do not know if new modems are still available from Mitac.

    I've beginning to stock more and more 6120 parts as demand increases. The 14.1" LCD inverter is no longer available from the factory, but in most cases I can repair your old inverter.
     
  • Mitac 6133  model specific notes and details TOP of page
  • Mitac 6133

    The Mitac 6133 is a Celeron CPU updated revision of the 5033. Other than the motherboard and a few other misc. items that two laptops sharemost of the same plastic case pieces and other items.
     
  • Mitac 7020  model specific notes and details TOP of page
  • 7020

    The Mitac 7020 is micro-PGA version of the 6120 and so most parts are the same in these two models -except for the CPU and CPU heatsink.

See the 6120 for more details

  • Mitac 7521  model specific notes and details TOP of page
  • Mitac 7521P  model specific notes and details TOP of page
  • Mitac 7521T model specific notes and details TOP of page
  • 7521
    The MTC (Mitac) 7521 was resold by quite a few resellers. Most if not all resellers had their own name for this laptop, but other than Jetta 7700's will have the Mitac model number (MTC 7521) on the label found case bottom that will help identify the laptop as a 7521. Three main sub-models exist - the original 7521, an updated 7521P (sometimes seen as 7521+) and finally the 7521T.

     

    If you can't determine what version of 7521 that you own, remove the small plastic cover strip that contains the plastic pushbutton for the on/off switch. To do this, press the small release located on the right side of the laptop and slide the cover panel towards the left. The cover should release after a small amount of travel. The main plastic case area that is revealed will have a white paper label (about 1" x 1/2") and the first few digits will be 7521, 7521P or 7521T.

     

    Each of these sub-models has its own limitations regarding CPU speed and or other characteristics.

     

    The 7521 and 7521P appear to have nearly the same overall spec's and I'm not sure of just what is the differences other than maybe changes in LCD's and/or other parts used. The 7521T will operate with a faster PIII CPU that the other two revisions. All three sub-models use Socket 370 CPU's (some times called "flip" chips) and have 66/100 MHz front bus speeds. Bus speeds are automatically controlled by the main chip set.

     

    The 7521T can support P3 CPU's up to 1.1 or 1.2 GHz vs. the earlier 7521 or 7521P limits of no faster than 800 MHz Celerons or possibly 1.1 GHz P3's. (Mitac claims 1GHz Celerons for the 7521P) All of the 7521 series of laptops were all Socket 370 Intel CPU laptops.

     

    You also lift up the keyboard from the rear edge when the On/Off switch panel is removed and under the keyboard is the location of the memory module slots. All revisionsof the 7521 uses 144 pin SODIMM SDRAM modules. Max memory is 512 MB, I believe.

     

    Sometimes you may need to update the BIOS to use the fastest CPU's and any Mitac BIOS update presents problems in getting the correct BIOS version plus flashing the chip correctly. If you screw the BIOS up then you will have major problems since the BIOS chip is soldered to the motherboard and can't be pulled and sent out for reflashing. Unlike many other brands, Mitac also has a programmable keyboard controller and the keyboard controller has its own BIOS. Again, reflashing to a newer version can cause problems because the keyboard controler is also soldered to the mainboard.

     

    There is a CMOS backup battery located in a socket near the CPU. To replace this battery you must remove the heatsink assembly and then you can pry the CMOS battery out of its socket - do not try to pry this socket from the motherboard! This battery is a few dollar item at most electronics parts stores.

     

    Most of these machines seem to have 14.1" LCD's, but both 14.1" TFT and 15.0" TFT LCD sizes were available.

     

    The floppy drive module is held in place by a single screw in the bottom side of the main case. The hard drive carrier is also part of the floppy drive module. So if you wish to update the hard drive - remove the floppy module to find the hard drive.

     

    The CD-ROM or DVD drive module is also removed via a single screw on the lower side of the main case. Cost for drives are still a problem because the module cost is high if ordered from Mitac and used drive modules rarely are available.

     

    Located on the bottom of the laptop are two removable plastic panels. The larger panel is the CPU fan cover plate. Two screw hold this panel in place and after removing them, you need to slide the panel towards the backside of the laptop to release several retainer fingers.  The smaller panel is for the optional modem. A single screw holds this panel in place. I do not know if new modems are still available from Mitac.

     

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